We live in a world made of codes, and between the fiscal code and the genetic code there is also the artistic code. The survey on the latter would have been difficult had it not been for Venice and its 56th edition of the Biennale. With 89 foreign national exhibitions and on a surface of 46,000 sqm + 6,526 sqm + 50,000 sqm of Giardini, Sale d’Armi and Arsenale, the “All the World’s Futures” is brought to life, together with our reflection on the “state of things” with Okwui Enwezor, the first black curator in the history of the event.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The Italian code is memory. For Alis / Filliol matter is memory: his monumental polyurethane and earth sculpture is inspired to the work of Medardo Rosso and to the equestrian statuary. For Francesco Barocco form is memory: his three studies on the idea of the head are classic timeless icons. According to Vanessa Beecroft the Avantguard is memory but memory is timeless in her “garden of stone” with a central bronze tribute to “Étant donnés” by Marcel Duchamp.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

For Jannis Kounellis source is memory. For Mimmo Paladino man is memory. In his tribute to Italy, for William Kentridge chronicle is memory and he displays drawings as stories for a new Trajan Column that leads you on a journey from Remo to Pasolini.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The pavilion I loved: Japan
Chiharu Shiota creates works with everyday materials focused on the reflection on life and death. After the opening image of “The Key in the Hand”, the artist has flooded the hall with endless weaved red threads, at the end of which each has got a key. No one will be saved alone.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The pavilion that particularly struck me: Germany.
The actors that populate the works of the German Olaf Nicolai, Hito Steyerl, Tobias Zielony and Jasmina Metway / Philip Rizk are figures both of rebellion and reflection on “work” and “migration.”

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The one I found most impressive: Greece.
Reflecting on the relationship between humans and animals, Maria Papdimitriou brings to Venice “Why you look at animals? AGRIMIKÁ” a real leather shop where untamable animals are the symbol of our resistance to decay around us. It is not always the man to be the hunter.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The one that took me in the future: Republic of Korea.
The movie installation of Kyungwon Moon and Jeon Joonho tells the future as if it were a retrospective. The main character lives in a “gilded cage” totally white and hyper-tech: she can overcome any physical limit and any kind of barrier.
La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The one most awaited: the United States.
And if the future will come “Without a world”? To “Under the Ice” by Halladór Laxness it is inspired the reflection on the fragility of nature by Joan Jonas. Canadian animals and landscapes of Nova Scotia interact with a group of children aged 5 to 16 that act as the of the story. Then perhaps there is still hope?

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

The one I found most irreverent: Great Britain.

Sarah Lucas plays with the clichés of issues such as gender and sexuality. Drawing inspiration from Surrealism for “Penetralia” and to Cycladic art in Athens for “NUD”, Lucas exhibits his plaster casts of penises in erection and his biomorphic abstract figures made of padded panty that suggest images of breasts and orifices. Have you ever seen half body sitting and relaxing while its navel smokes a cigarette?

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The one I found most consistent with the investigation of reality: the Netherlands.
The one I found more in step with the complexity of the things that surround us: Spain.
The one I found unexpectedly poetic: Switzerland.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

In this Biennale among many sounds, I also saw a lot of words. It is said that now people look only at images. I don’t believe that. In art, letters win, whether neon or written in pencil. The art will remain encrypted and we can only practice in giving it new interpretations.

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

 

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

La Biennale di Venezia, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi

#ALLTHEWORLDSFUTURE #followtheartgirl

Credits:
Special thanks to:
Paolo Di Landro
360+One Quarter
Le Madamadorè
Photo: Caterina De Zottis www.cdzph.tumblr.com @cdzphotograhy

AMOlinks:
La Biennale di Venezia
I numeri della Biennale – Artsy
Il mio articolo per i-D su The Venetian Blinds
Il mio articolo per i-D sulle novità della Biennale