“The beginning is something immediate. It’s matter that decides “.



MUDEC – Museo delle Culture of Milan gives us a journey into the matter of the famous Spanish artist with an exhibition curated by the Fundació Joan Miró, under the artistic direction of Rosa Maria Malet with Francesco Poli, promoted by the Municipality of Milan-Culture department and 24 ORE Cultura – Gruppo 24 Ore. “Joan Miró. The force of matter” focuses on the years between 1931 and 1981, gestation and birth of a new language, freedom of movement, the anti-painting, sculpture, tapestry, engraving …

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

“Untitled” (1949): the first work of the poet of color that I meet, it’s line without a title, rhyme without vowels, no figure of speech with no speech. It is certain, though, that looking at it , I saw the moon … without stars. And, according to the will of the artist, as it is right to speak of poetry it is as right to devote oneself to music. So from the night sky we switch to “Music of the twilight I” (1965). Oil on canvas that shows the color constellations, brightness of planets, ideal forms and unreal figures of prehistoric echo, musical echo…

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

From the fracture of nihilism and the destructiveness of Dada, a new language was born, to which even Miró dare not to name: his painting is “X”, impossible to define the mother company of his art.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

 

I feel observed by flocks of silent eyes: they are the “Birds” by the artist. Watching them closely I become convinced that they are part of the same family and type.
“Woman and Bird in the Night” (1969) is mostly red and the paper seems imbued with an extended bloodstain. The female figure turns away and becomes “Woman in the Night” (1973) which starts and comes to life from a blue spot and then there’s black, red and yellow.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Removed the Bird, symbol of meditation between heaven and earth, gone the Woman, symbol of life and fertility, in the end there remains only a “Character in the Night” (1974). And, continuing the work of removal, it is nothing more than a blank canvas: “Poetry” (1974).

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Because in Miró’s art poetry has plastic implications and in poetry Miró finds the organic substrate that inspires all of his creation.

 Away from the Brancusi’s formal purity and Duchamp’s nihilism, from Picasso’s heroism and from Calder’s kinetic sculpture, Miró manipulates everyday and popular objects, assembling and creating new forms in bronze.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

At the foundry Clementi in Meudon, at Susse in Arcueil (Paris) or Parella in Barcelona, “certain objects, which can only be accessed through dreams” (in the Breton’s words), took new life through bronze.
Before me appears “Woman and Bird” (1967), made in the year in which the artist introduced color in his sculptural process. As well as a pair of hands playing in front of the light of a lamp and builds with their shadows animals and faces that, once turned on the light will cease to exist, the same way I see a root of a tree and a cover and it’s like I found the switch.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Rebellious until the anti-painting, even anarchist towards Surrealism, creator of assemblage / sculptures and paintings / dreamlike abstractions, he had dominated the academic culture before he reversed it and always respected an extreme order in his study before coming to subvert iconography, burning, punching and attacking (and not just paint) the canvas.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

After the support was selected, he altered, as evidenced by “The soldier on leave” (1974).
 While the figure in black moves, advancing between arrows, stars and spots, he tells me he was hit by his own Creator. Miró left the imprint of his hand in black: an act so violent as risky for the life of the subject of the work, for the artist’s success. Survived both, in the same year Miró decided to submit his five more provocative paintings, the result of his “incendiary tendency”, in the retrospective at the Grand Palais in Paris in 1974. The rest is history, everything else is matter.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Among the “heads” with bloody eyes in acrylic paint and oil paintings, “Morning Cocks” of tarred canvas and “Ducks in flight” in pompier style, one and only one remains constant in Joan Miró’s magical, material and magnetic art: the drawing. The common thread of the Catalan artist’s works is an original calligraphy of signs that can expand, thicken and reach every aspect of reality and make it dreamlike.

This is Miró’s force, the painter who had lit (also literally) the sacred fire of art.

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Joan Miró, Eloisa Reverie Vezzosi, MUDEC, Milano

Credits:
Special thanks to Rossella Jardini
Photo: Carlotta Coppo

AMOlinks:
www.mudec.it/miro
www.fmirobcn.org